Raymond O. Watkins - A Man of Substance

Sunrise: August 31, 1919
Sunset: May 18, 2017
National Scout Commissioner 1975-1981

Ray Watkins was a pioneer among the early pioneers of the Scout Movement in Trinidad and Tobago.

Born in the village of Erin, the young Raymond Watkins attended the St. Francis Village R.C. School and became a member of the First Erin Cub Pack in 1928. His father was an Englishman by birth and was in charge of plantations in south-east Trinidad. Ray spent a short time at school in Erin before enrolling at St. Joseph Boys R.C. School. This early movement was to become a pattern in his life, for after sitting his College Exhibition Examination he moved back to Erin, continuing his scouting there and becoming a pupil teacher.

After passing his teacher examinations he began teaching at the Mayaro Government School in 1941. The family was then living in Mayaro. There he became a Cub Master, as they were called in those days.

In 1942, when he was transferred to Tobago, he served as a leader in the Mason Hall Scout Group. In 1947, he moved to Arima and made the Royal Chartered Borough his home. He taught at Arima Boys’ Government and Blanchisseuse Schools. By the time he became a Probation Officer, he was well grounded in the humanities and other disciplines, being a well-read person. This job took him to many areas of Trinidad and he served his fellowmen well.

His career culminated with his being chosen as the Association’s first Executive Commissioner, where he served until his retirement.

During a career that spanned over twenty five years, he met, trained and worked with countless volunteers and leaders.

As National Scout Commissioner, he showed tremendous foresight and vision in predicting and preparing for the numerous challenges that the movement would face during early years of nation building. During his tenure, many innovations to the program and the structure of the movement took place.

He lived his life by the Scout Promise and fulfilled in every way the exhortations of the founder that we should leave the World better than we found it.

At the end of his life’s journey, along his chosen path, in all he did, he has indeed shown us true courage in being the best that he could be—A MAN OF HONOUR, A MAN OF SUBSTANCE.

 

 

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